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Book Recommendations from us to you!

EYFS

Reading to children often (if possible, at least once a day) is a great goal. Choosing regular times to read (especially before bedtime) helps them learn to sit with a book and relax. But you can read anytime your child seems in the mood.

 

When children reach three, they can often follow slightly longer stories but they will still love listening to their old favourites again and again - they might even be able to retell them to you! 

Why not try some of our favourite books that are just the ticket for 4-year-olds - slightly longer stories full of fun that they'll love chatting to you about.

Five-year-olds might be starting to read on their own, but they will still love sharing books with you.

 

KS1

Did you know that a regular nightly bedtime routine is associated with improved sleep in young children? We think there's nothing better than snuggling up and sharing a soothing bedtime story to send them off to the land of nod.

For lots of tips, guides and advice from top experts, authors and illustrators - see the Book Trust advice page

https://www.booktrust.org.uk/books-and-reading/tips-and-advice/bath-book-bed/#!?q=&sortOption=MostRecent&pageNo=1

You'll find information about how to get your childto sleep, how to keep the bedtime routine going to make sure your child is well rested, and recommendations of our favourite bedtime stories.

Key Stage 2

Research has shown that reading for pleasure can make a huge difference to children - not only academically (even in subjects like maths) but also socially and emotionally.

Here are some things that could help your child continue to love reading...

  • Talk about books. Talking to children about books and stories can help them to realise how exciting they are. Show an interest in what they've read, ask questions about it, and swap opinions.
  • Make it fun! There are so many fun things you can do with books beyond reading them. Maybe you could ask your children to draw their favourite character or act out what they've read for you. Or perhaps you could try recreating some classic book covers and taking photos!
  • ... and try funny books. Everyone likes a good giggle! (If your child is brave, scary stories or gory horror might be worth a go too.)
  • Don't worry about what your children are reading. Whether it's a short story, poetry, a graphic novel, non-fiction, joke books, a comic or even the back of a cereal packet, it doesn't matter what your child is reading - as long as they're enjoying it! Anything could kickstart a love of books. (And don't panic if they read the same book over and over again, either.)
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